30. June 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: Web Design · Tags:

Many of today’s most popular design trends (including flat design, large background images, and hidden global navigation) are directly or indirectly influenced by minimalism, a web-design movement that began in the early 2000’s, but borrows its philosophy from earlier movements in the fields of fine art and human–computer interaction. Minimalism sometimes presents as an attempt to prioritize content over the chrome and, when applied correctly, it can help you focus your design to simplify user tasks.

Source: The Roots of Minimalism in Web Design

16. May 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: Web Design · Tags:

The web operates in ways that can conflict with our traditional view of what a “story”—with a set start, middle, and end—is. Content is chunked, spread across various channels, devices, and formats. How do we define story lines, characters, interactions, and the role of the audience, given this information sprawl?

Building Nonlinear Narratives for the Web · An A List Apart Article

10. June 2014 · Write a comment · Categories: Web Design · Tags:

As one of the core design principles, typography can really make or break a website design. Despite recent advances in web type technology we’re still fairly limited when it comes to creative typography layouts, meaning image replacement techniques are still common, but these days we have massive choice when it comes to selecting fonts for our designs.

15 Creative Forms of Typography In Web Design

Copyblogger calls this practice digital sharecropping, and it works in a similar fashion to the the feudal system, where the landlords reap the rewards, and the peasants do all the work.

We don’t know which empires will stand strong in the future. Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn change their terms and conditions on a regular basis, and as tenants, we don’t know what they have in store for us.

Why you should consider investing in digital real estate – The Next Web

“In most cases, a discussion of landing pages and microsites comes down to their differences: single page versus multi-page, one call-to-action versus multiple calls-to-action, and simplicity versus complexity. However, when you take a step back, they have something critically important in common from a marketing standpoint: They draw on the power of single-theme landing experiences, existing outside the structure of the run-of-the-mill corporate website.”

Unlocking the Power of Single-Theme Landing Experiences – Website Magazine