Capping a week of incompetence, failures, and general shady behavior in responding to its massive data breach, Equifax has confirmed that attackers entered its system in mid-May through a web application vulnerability that had a patch available in March. In other words, the credit-reporting giant had more than two months to take precautions that would have defended the personal data of 143 million people from being exposed. It didn’t.

Source: The Equifax Breach Was Entirely Preventable | WIRED

Nadim Kobeissi wants to bulldoze that steep learning curve. At the HOPE hacker conference in New York later this month he’ll release a beta version of an all-purpose file encryption program called miniLock, a free and open-source browser plugin designed to let even Luddites encrypt and decrypt files with practically uncrackable cryptographic protection in seconds.

The Ultra-Simple App That Lets Anyone Encrypt Anything | Threat Level | WIRED

There are new interception hurdles everywhere you look. Even plain old SSL encryption is becoming more difficult to snoop on. Previously, governments could rely on complicit or compromised certificate authorities to provide them with the means to intercept encrypted traffic. Thanks to the Iranian government’s overly enthusiastic use of this technique, Google made changes to the Chrome browser to neuter the practice. Similar updates are expected soon in Internet Explorer. There goes another interception technique for law enforcement!

Tech Companies and Government May Soon Go to War Over Surveillance | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

CISPA, the controversial cybersecurity bill passed by the House last week, appears to be dead in the Senate. It’s deja vu all over again for the measure, which would authorize private companies to share your email, texts and other personal information with federal agencies without a warrant or other privacy protections. Last year, CISPA also cleared the House but foundered in the Senate.

CISPA, The Privacy-Threatening Cyberspying Bill, Is Dead In The Senate – ReadWrite.